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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ...been alive when Vasari and Condivi published their works, he would not have passed them over in silence. He might easily have proved, that when Bonarruoti fled to Florence, that is to say, in the year 1506, he himself was not at Rome, nor was invited thither till two years afterwards; and that, therefore, he could not have obtained a furtive view of the paintings in the Sistine Chapel. Raphael might have proved, too, that from the year 1508, at which time Michael Angelo had not perhaps commenced his work, till 1511, the year that he exhibited the first half of it, he himself had been constantly aiming at a more elevated style; and that, as Bonarruoti had compassed this point by studying the Belvidere torso, so had he accomplished the same object, by studying not only the torso but other remains of antiquity, whose manner of design is plainly visible in his works. He might have asked Vasari in what he considered grandeur and majesty of style to consist; and might, both from the example of the ancient Greeks, and the reason of the thing itself, have taught him, that the sublime does not consist in an indiscriminate adoption of muscularity of limb or violence of gesture; but, as Mengs also has observed, in the selection of the nobler, and the neglect of the inferior and meaner parts, and in exciting elevated ideas by novelty of invention. Hence, by little and little, he might have pointed out to him what there was of sublime in the School of Athens, as it is called--in the majesty of the edifice, the contour of the figures, the disposition of the drapery, the gravity of countenance and demeanour; and might easily have traced the source of this sublimity to the remains of ancient art. And granting that he did adopt a more elevated style in...