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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 Excerpt: ...viii. pp. 266-270). 1 Hist, of Art, torn. v. p. 635. of an ancient lake (Fig. 127).2 Arab historians assert that Arde Fic 127.--Feruz-Abad. View of ruined tower. Flandin and Coste, Perse ancienne, Plate XXXV. shir erected, in his new capital, an atesh-gah of sufficient dimensions 2 Dieulafoy, L'Art antique de la Perse, torn. iv. p 6. to have attracted the attention of travellers.1 Masoudy, however, who visited Fars in 910 or thereabouts, formally states that the Beit-en-Nar (fire-temple) "built by Ardeshir stood upon a knoll an hour beyond the town of Ghur; near it was a very curious spring, around which was celebrated a yearly festival. But, as we have seen, the ruin in question is in the middle of a flat level, and represents the swamp formerly drained by Ardeshir, bounded on either side by an arm of the river; whilst throughout the canton no other spring is met with except that which jets up and gushes forth in front of the palace, five kilometres hence in a northern direction.a Consequently the site of the temple seen by Masoudy should be sought on one of the spurs of the range which overhangs the palace.3 As to the ruin figured on the preceding page, may not it be the "lofty tower," the fortress which, according to Tabari, went by the name of terbal, tower, and which Ardeshir had built in the middle of the town? Masoudy does indeed mention it, but he adds that it had been destroyed by the Muslims. It was, perhaps, a watch-tower, of which the exterior staircases leading to the platform and the outer works were destroyed by the Arabs, and reduced to its present fragmentary state, which justified the epithet used by the historian. We fear, then, that the notion of a temple built by a Sassanid prince must be abandoned as illusory. All we kno...