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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1859 Excerpt: ..."upper floors incur no additional ground-rent." This is well enough as a matter of utility, and we are compelled to receive it, and apply such means as are in our power to reconcile the extreme altitude of the structure thus created with its lack of width, and, as it were, force it to make an architectural appearance, despite its unhappy proportions. Design УШ. is composed with a view of being executed in granite; a stone particularly adapted to a composition of large parts, but yet quite appropriate for the heavier kind of ornamentation. Its name has particular reference to its structure, which is granular, the parts or grains being mingled without order or regularity. It exists in the old and new world, of various qualities and colors. But its use for architectural purposes is perhaps nowhere more considerable than in the Russian capital, St. Petersburg, where palaces and dwelling-houses alike display their granite fronts. Bridges, and high walls lining the banks of the great Neva, and some of the principal canals, exhibit the profusion with which the material abounds in that region. The largest mass of granite known to have been transported in modern times, is the rock which serves as a pedestal for the equestrian statue of Peter the Great. This is of the red-granite of Ingria, and was originally thirty-two feet long, twenty-one feet thick, and seventeen feet wide; but it has been much reduced in size, in order to give it the form and picturesque appearance of a natural rock. It was disengaged from a swamp, and removed a distance of forty versts, or nearly twenty-seven miles, to St. Petersburg, its weight being calculated to exceed three millions of pounds. Cannon-balls of iron were at first used as rollers, for its transportation, ...