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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 Excerpt: ...together by horizontal and vertical field riveted angles at the eaves (Fig. 189). The ceiling rafters have gusset plates and angle clips connecting them to the longitudinal beams which are riveted to the vertical members in the main roof trusses (see Fig. 189). There is no diagonal bracing and no X-bracing in the roof panels, but the columns are knee-braced with pairs of 4x3inch angles to the gallery floor girders. The pitched roofs are covered with slate laid on 2xi£xJ-inch angles riveted to the top flanges of the rafters, roof trusses and jack rafters. Wooden furring strips are bolted to the lower chord flanges of Trusses A and Supporting Column. the roof trusses, to the ceiling rafters and to the column brackets, to carry the lathing for the vaulted ceilings. The total weight of structural steel in the building is about 370 tons." For a more complete description of the steel framework of this building see the Engineering Record of Dec. 14, 1901. 80. Fig. 190 shows one of four arched trusses which support the roof, and ceiling of the Roman Catholic Church at Tremont, New York City. These trusses were also designed by Mr. Berger for the architect, Mr. John E. Kerby. The principal dimensions of the trusses, which are spaced 16 ft. 4 ins. from centre to centre, are given in the illustration. The trusses are about 7 ft. deep at the crown, 7 ft. deep at the eaves and 2 ft. deep midway between these points. The lower chords support the furring and metal lath for the plaster ceiling which forms a Gothic vault and conceals the trusses. All the trusses are alike except one end truss which supports part of the transept roof, and is a little heavier than the others, the dimensions given in Fig. 190 being for this truss, the chord angles of the other trusse...