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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 Excerpt: ...known examples are the openwork spires of Burgos, begun in 1442, imitated not from a French work but a German one, the cathedral of Cologne. The most ambitious church of fifteenth century Spain, the cathedral of Seville (Figs. 139,140, and 172), was begun in 1401. Here the warm climate of Andalusia and the Moorish influence of a country long under Moslem domination exaggerated the typically Spanish characteristics of the architecture. Roofs are never so flat, piers never so widely spaced, interiors never so gloomy, as at Seville. The detail has a specially Moorish eccentricity. Indeed the Spaniards combined Moorish and Christian detail so skilfully that buildings like the famous Sevillan Giralda (Fig. 172) present FIG. 169 MARBURG. SAINT ELIZABETH. THE INTERIOR, LOOKING TOWARD THE APSE Marburg, Saint Elizabeth Ndrdlingcn, Saint George FIG. I7O SYSTEMS OF HALLENKIRCHEN a harmonious whole when actually constructed in several different and seemingly antagonistic periods. Origin of the Gothic style in Italy. In no country were the fundamentals of the Gothic structural systems as completely disregarded as in Italy, nevertheless the style attained there a strong position and produced monuments of great charm. It was, however, purely adventitious. Italy was the home of classical Roman architecture. It received Romanesque readily, but gave it so strong a flavor of classic art that the style, as we have seen, has often been called that of the proto L Renaissance. Italy had always been prone to classic revivals, and in the Romanesque period showed signs of being ready for the greatest of them all--the Renaissance--when the peninsula was overwhelmed by the wave of Gothic fashion, and for two centuries the pointed style was supreme. It was, however, an imported, foreig...